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Sponsorship of parents, children, spouses (common-law, conjugal, same sex), refugees.

Can she move to Canada? How? When? 

ForumUser
ForumUser
Posts: 525


Posted On: 5/10/2016
ForumUser
ForumUser
Posts: 525
Hi there,

I was reading through the site but am still a little confused and maybe explaining the situation you may be able to help me

There is a girl in Alaska that i want to marry but am unsure of the exact process we would have to do so i can have her move in and live with me.

We are not married yet, only engaged, but she has some debt at the moment.

Does that debt need to be paid off in full or can she continue paying those with my help after moving here?

Also, do you need to be fully married to move to canada? or can you just be engaged and have the wedding at a later date to help plan for it better?

How would getting a job work as well?

Thanks for your time!
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Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3700


Posted On: 5/19/2016
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3700
Hello,

Thank you for sharing your question and situation with us.

In terms of the debt that she has, she may need to contact the places where the debt is owed in order to find out what her options are and if there are arrangements that can be made in this type of situation. She may want to see if her bank has a partner in Canada, where she can try to make an arrangement to pay off the debt.

It may be best for her to speak to an accountant or a lawyer in order to determine what she needs to tie up loose financial ends.

In terms of the option of starting a sponsorship from within Canada, you can look at the different conditions that need to be met for sponsorship in our How do I sponsor a spouse, common-law partner or dependent child from inside Canada? article.

Regarding your question about working in Canada, according to the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada website,

Foreign nationals in Canada applying to immigrate as a spouse or common-law partner will continue to have the opportunity to work while waiting for their application to be finalized. A pilot program giving them open work permits is being extended for one year, until December 22, 2016.

To be eligible for an open work permit, you must be a spouse or common-law partner living in Canada who is being sponsored under the Spouse or common-law partner in Canada (SCLPC) class. You must have valid temporary resident status (as a visitor, student or worker) and live at the same address as your sponsor.



If you have any additional questions, you may want to contact the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada Call Centre directly.


I hope this information is helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions and if there is any follow up to your question/situation.


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Anna
Settlement.Org Content and Information/Referral Specialist, CIRS
Settlement.Org
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