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Eligible for E.I. if relocating for Spouse's Job? 

ForumUser
ForumUser
Posts: 504


Posted On: 6/7/2016
ForumUser
ForumUser
Posts: 504
I need some help locating information.

My wife has accepted a position in Toronto and we need to move from Calgary.

I have heard that I may qualify for EI insurance because my spouse is relocating. Is this true and if so, how do I find the info i need in order to see if I qualify?

Is there any other moving assistance offered on a federal or province of Ont level?

I have a list of placement agencies I plan on contacting this week (We need to be settled in Toronto by 3rd week of July) to line up meetings to assist with my job hunt.

Thank-You for your time.
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Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2846


Posted On: 6/9/2016
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2846
Hello,

Thank you for sharing your situation and question with us.

We can appreciate that you would be concerned about this situation.


You can find some detailed information in this Community Advocacy & Legal Centre (CALC) - I need to move with my spouse or child: Can I get Employment Insurance benefits? document.


Here is an excerpt,

I need to move with my spouse or child: Can I get Employment Insurance benefits?


Even though you would usually be refused Employment Insurance (EI) benefits if you quit your job, there are exceptions to this rule. For example, if you quit your job because your spouse or child needs to move and you need to move with him or her you might still get EI benefits.

When you apply for EI benefits with a Record of Employment which shows that you quit your job, you will most likely be contacted by a member of Service Canada. You will have to show a few things to prove that you had just cause for quitting.

First, you must show that your spouse, common law partner or dependent child had to move to another residence (such as anew city or province).

Under the Employment Insurance Act a “common law”partner is someone you have lived with in a conjugal relationship for at least one full year. In special circumstances, you could be considered common law partners even if you have not lived together for a full year; for example, if you and your partner are expecting a baby, you have adopted a child or you are getting married in the near future.

Second, you must show that you had no reasonable alternative to leaving your job. This might include situations where it would simply be too expensive for you and your partner to live in separate residences or where it is impossible for you to keep your old job by commuting to work or transferring to another position within your company.

Third, you must continue to show that at your new location, you are ready, willing, and able to work at all times. You will have to look for work at the new location and keep a written record of the employers you contact and when you contacted them.

If you leave your job because you prefer to move with your spouse or common-law partner when there are other reasonable alternatives or ways for you to stay at your job, it will be difficult to show that you had just cause for quitting.

Every situation is different and the person who will decide whether you are eligible for EI benefits will look at all of your personal circumstances before making a decision. It is important that you get legal advice before you quit your job for any reason.

If you are refused EI benefits,you can appeal the decision. Call the clinic for help.





You can find some additional information on the Service Canada website in the Employment Insurance (EI) and voluntarily leaving - A number of circumstances for quitting are considered just cause section.

Here is an excerpt,

You are justified voluntarily leaving your job in the following situations if, considering all the circumstances, quitting your job was the only reasonable alternative in your case:
[...]

As you may have noticed, it is difficult for us to comment on specific cases.

It is best if you contact Service Canada directly for some information specific to your situation.

You can find some contact information on the Service Canada website.

Or call,

Toll-Free: 1-800-206-7218 (TTY: 1-800-529-3742)

I hope this information is helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions and if there is any follow up to your question/situation.

=====
Anna
Settlement.Org Content and Information/Referral Specialist, CIRS
Settlement.Org
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