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Maintaining my PR Status 

evebabe
evebabe
Posts: 1


Posted On: 5/17/2017
evebabe
evebabe
Posts: 1
Hello,
My name is Yvette.

I became a canadian PR on the 14th of may 2014.

Since then, I have been on and off from Canada. I had my son in Canada who is a Canadian Citizen now but we moved back to Sweden because

I am also a Swedish permanent residence.

I am wondering if the time I spend with my son who is a Canadian citizen is counted as residency days?

Presently, I have spent 10 months in Canada and I am worried I may not be able to meet up with the 2 years minimum residency requirement.

My second question is this;

what if i dont meet the residency requit´rement. Can I be able to renew my PR based on humanitarian reasons?

My main reason why I am in sweden is because I have a son who has a medical condition and is not allowed to travel out of sweden.
Thanks and I look forward to a timely response from you
link
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2182


Posted On: 5/25/2017
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2182
Hello Yvette,

Thank you for sharing your situation and question with us.

We can appreciate that you would be interested in this type of information.

In terms of counting the time outside to meet Canadian citizenship residency requirements, you can find some information on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website in the Can I count any time I’ve spent outside of Canada toward the physical presence requirement when applying for citizenship? section.

Here is an excerpt,



Can I count any time I’ve spent outside of Canada toward the physical presence requirement when applying for citizenship?



Time spent outside Canada does not count towards the physical presence requirement except in certain circumstances.

You can count time spent outside Canada toward the physical presence requirement for citizenship if you:

-Were a permanent resident employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, federal public administration, or public service of a province or territory; or

-Resided outside Canada with your:

-Canadian spouse or common-law partner, or
-permanent resident spouse, common-law partner, or parent
who was employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, federal public administration, or public service of a province or territory.

Employment as a locally engaged person is not included.


Unfortunately, a parent accompanying a Canadian Citizen child does not count for maintaining permanent residency.

Regarding not meeting the residency requirement and loss of permanent residency status, it is important to note that in terms of loss of permanent residency, a person does not lose it until a final determination has been made.

This means that your PR status needs to be formally removed.

You can find some information on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website, Here is an excerpt,


Losing your permanent resident status does not happen automatically. You cannot lose your permanent resident status simply by living outside of Canada long enough that you don’t meet the residency requirement. Unless you have gone through an official process, you have not lost or given up your permanent resident status, even though you may not be eligible to return to Canada as a permanent resident.
You may lose your permanent resident status if:
You may lose your permanent resident status in one of the ways described above if:
  • you do not live in Canada for two out of five years;
  • you are convicted of a serious crime and told to leave Canada; or
  • you become a Canadian citizen.
You do not lose your permanent resident status if your PR card expires.

According to the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) ENF 23 - Loss of Permanent Resident Status manual,


It is important to note that a permanent resident does not lose their status under A46(1)(b) until there is a final determination of the decision made outside Canada that they have failed to comply with the residency obligation under A28.

Permanent residents are not finally determined to have lost their permanent resident status until the right of appeal has been exhausted.


It also states in relation to the process of loss of permanent residency,


5. Departmental Policy

When an officer believes a permanent resident has failed to comply with their A28 residency obligation, then that officer should report the permanent resident under the provisions of A44(1) and recommend the issuing of a departure order.

The form Questionnaire: Determination of Permanent Resident Status (IMM 5511B) has been developed specifically to assist officers in making decisions regarding the permanent residency obligation, keeping in mind that the questionnaire alone is not sufficient to determine compliance with the residency obligation, and a detailed interview including examining humanitarian and compassionate criteria under A28(2)(c) is needed.

Furthermore, the officer cannot seize the person’s documents (such as the IMM 1000, Immigrant Visa and Record of Landing and the IMM 5292B, for example) despite writing an A44(1) report and issuing a removal order unless the officer believes there are reasonable grounds to do so in accordance with A140. The rationale behind this is that the person has a right to appeal the removal order and, until final determination of status, they remain a permanent resident and are the lawful owner of said documents.


Additionally, we have previously received some information from one of our legal researchers related to being in Canada after not meeting the residency requirements.

According to their research, the five-year time frame set out in the Refugee and Immigrant Protection Act is not static. Rather it is a moveable window that is dependent on the time at which a visa officer examines your situation. Therefore, if you cannot fulfill the two-year (730 day) requirement for the five-year time frame starting from when you became a permanent resident, you should remain in Canada until you can satisfy the requirement for another five-year time frame.

The IRCC’s Permanent Residency Status Determination Manual states:

For persons who have been permanent residents of Canada for more than five years, the only five-year period that can be considered in calculating whether an applicant has met the residency obligation is the one immediately before the application is received in the visa office. A28(2)(b)(ii) precludes a visa officer from examining any period other than the most recent five-year period immediately before the date of receipt of the application.


Since the officer cannot choose any five-year time period for consideration, but must always assess the most recent five-year time period (the one immediately preceding examination), if you enter Canada, you may still have the opportunity to satisfy the two-year “in Canada” requirement.

As you may already know, a PR card is required to re-enter Canada.

If you have a PR card, it is important to note that the PR card's expiry date has no correlation between whether or not you have met the residency requirements.

In terms of re-entering Canada, you may want to look at what your options are on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website in the What happens if my permanent resident card expires while I am outside Canada? section.

This section discusses options and "other documents you can use to re-enter the country" if your card expires while outside Canada and you plan to return to Canada by private vehicle.

We suggest that it is important and probably best that you speak to a Lawyer who is familiar with Canadian immigration issues for additional information regarding your situation.

I hope this information is helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions and if there is any follow up to your question/situation.

=====
Anna
Settlement.Org Content and Information/Referral Specialist, CIRS
Settlement.Org
link
LNIG LAAU
LNIG LAAU
Posts: 1


Posted On: 6/2/2017
LNIG LAAU
LNIG LAAU
Posts: 1
Hi there,
My query is about whether short travels outside Canada with a Canadian spouse will be counted towards the 2 years for Residency Requirement.
I read on the CIC official site that : ..."Time spent outside Canada may also count towards the two years if you are travelling with your spouse or partner who is a Canadian citizen..."
The link to that web page is : http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/helpcentre/answer.asp?qnum=727&top=4

I hold a PR card and am living with my spouse in Toronto. If I go on a brief leisure trip(e.g. 2 weeks to 1 month) outside Canada with my spouse who is a Canadian citizen who lives and works in Canada, will my those days outside Canada be DEFINITELY counted towards the two years ?
If that is the case, what does the Immigration expect me to produce to prove I am travelling with my spouse ?


Looking forward for your your prompt reply. Many thanks.

link
sanrit
sanrit
Posts: 9


Posted On: 6/10/2017
sanrit
sanrit
Posts: 9
As per your guide line physical presence requirement do not include Local Employment Given by Canadian Employer for do job out side Canada ? IT must be Goverment Job for counting purpose ?

Please let me know



Moderator wrote:
Hello Yvette,

Thank you for sharing your situation and question with us.

We can appreciate that you would be interested in this type of information.

In terms of counting the time outside to meet Canadian citizenship residency requirements, you can find some information on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website in the Can I count any time I’ve spent outside of Canada toward the physical presence requirement when applying for citizenship? section.

Here is an excerpt,



Can I count any time I’ve spent outside of Canada toward the physical presence requirement when applying for citizenship?



Time spent outside Canada does not count towards the physical presence requirement except in certain circumstances.

You can count time spent outside Canada toward the physical presence requirement for citizenship if you:

-Were a permanent resident employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, federal public administration, or public service of a province or territory; or

-Resided outside Canada with your:

-Canadian spouse or common-law partner, or
-permanent resident spouse, common-law partner, or parent
who was employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, federal public administration, or public service of a province or territory.

Employment as a locally engaged person is not included.


Unfortunately, a parent accompanying a Canadian Citizen child does not count for maintaining permanent residency.

Regarding not meeting the residency requirement and loss of permanent residency status, it is important to note that in terms of loss of permanent residency, a person does not lose it until a final determination has been made.

This means that your PR status needs to be formally removed.

You can find some information on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website, Here is an excerpt,


Losing your permanent resident status does not happen automatically. You cannot lose your permanent resident status simply by living outside of Canada long enough that you don’t meet the residency requirement. Unless you have gone through an official process, you have not lost or given up your permanent resident status, even though you may not be eligible to return to Canada as a permanent resident.
You may lose your permanent resident status if:
You may lose your permanent resident status in one of the ways described above if:
  • you do not live in Canada for two out of five years;
  • you are convicted of a serious crime and told to leave Canada; or
  • you become a Canadian citizen.
You do not lose your permanent resident status if your PR card expires.

According to the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) ENF 23 - Loss of Permanent Resident Status manual,


It is important to note that a permanent resident does not lose their status under A46(1)(b) until there is a final determination of the decision made outside Canada that they have failed to comply with the residency obligation under A28.

Permanent residents are not finally determined to have lost their permanent resident status until the right of appeal has been exhausted.


It also states in relation to the process of loss of permanent residency,


5. Departmental Policy

When an officer believes a permanent resident has failed to comply with their A28 residency obligation, then that officer should report the permanent resident under the provisions of A44(1) and recommend the issuing of a departure order.

The form Questionnaire: Determination of Permanent Resident Status (IMM 5511B) has been developed specifically to assist officers in making decisions regarding the permanent residency obligation, keeping in mind that the questionnaire alone is not sufficient to determine compliance with the residency obligation, and a detailed interview including examining humanitarian and compassionate criteria under A28(2)(c) is needed.

Furthermore, the officer cannot seize the person’s documents (such as the IMM 1000, Immigrant Visa and Record of Landing and the IMM 5292B, for example) despite writing an A44(1) report and issuing a removal order unless the officer believes there are reasonable grounds to do so in accordance with A140. The rationale behind this is that the person has a right to appeal the removal order and, until final determination of status, they remain a permanent resident and are the lawful owner of said documents.


Additionally, we have previously received some information from one of our legal researchers related to being in Canada after not meeting the residency requirements.

According to their research, the five-year time frame set out in the Refugee and Immigrant Protection Act is not static. Rather it is a moveable window that is dependent on the time at which a visa officer examines your situation. Therefore, if you cannot fulfill the two-year (730 day) requirement for the five-year time frame starting from when you became a permanent resident, you should remain in Canada until you can satisfy the requirement for another five-year time frame.

The IRCC’s Permanent Residency Status Determination Manual states:

For persons who have been permanent residents of Canada for more than five years, the only five-year period that can be considered in calculating whether an applicant has met the residency obligation is the one immediately before the application is received in the visa office. A28(2)(b)(ii) precludes a visa officer from examining any period other than the most recent five-year period immediately before the date of receipt of the application.


Since the officer cannot choose any five-year time period for consideration, but must always assess the most recent five-year time period (the one immediately preceding examination), if you enter Canada, you may still have the opportunity to satisfy the two-year “in Canada” requirement.

As you may already know, a PR card is required to re-enter Canada.

If you have a PR card, it is important to note that the PR card's expiry date has no correlation between whether or not you have met the residency requirements.

In terms of re-entering Canada, you may want to look at what your options are on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website in the What happens if my permanent resident card expires while I am outside Canada? section.

This section discusses options and "other documents you can use to re-enter the country" if your card expires while outside Canada and you plan to return to Canada by private vehicle.

We suggest that it is important and probably best that you speak to a Lawyer who is familiar with Canadian immigration issues for additional information regarding your situation.

I hope this information is helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions and if there is any follow up to your question/situation.

=====
Anna
Settlement.Org Content and Information/Referral Specialist, CIRS
Settlement.Org
link
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2182


Posted On: 7/10/2017
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2182
Hello,

As stated on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website in the Can I count any time I’ve spent outside of Canada toward the physical presence requirement when applying for citizenship? section,


Can I count any time I’ve spent outside of Canada toward the physical presence requirement when applying for citizenship?



Time spent outside Canada does not count towards the physical presence requirement except in certain circumstances.

You can count time spent outside Canada toward the physical presence requirement for citizenship if you:

-Were a permanent resident employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, federal public administration, or public service of a province or territory; or

-Resided outside Canada with your:

-Canadian spouse or common-law partner, or
-permanent resident spouse, common-law partner, or parent
who was employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, federal public administration, or public service of a province or territory.

Employment as a locally engaged person is not included.



I hope this information is helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions and if there is any follow up to your question/situation.

=====
Anna
Settlement.Org Content and Information/Referral Specialist, CIRS
Settlement.Org
link
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2182


Posted On: 7/10/2017
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2182
Hello,

As stated on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) website in the Can I count any time I’ve spent outside of Canada toward the physical presence requirement when applying for citizenship? section,


Can I count any time I’ve spent outside of Canada toward the physical presence requirement when applying for citizenship?



Time spent outside Canada does not count towards the physical presence requirement except in certain circumstances.

You can count time spent outside Canada toward the physical presence requirement for citizenship if you:

-Were a permanent resident employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, federal public administration, or public service of a province or territory; or

-Resided outside Canada with your:

-Canadian spouse or common-law partner, or
-permanent resident spouse, common-law partner, or parent
who was employed in or with the Canadian Armed Forces, federal public administration, or public service of a province or territory.

Employment as a locally engaged person is not included.



I hope this information is helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions and if there is any follow up to your question/situation.

=====
Anna
Settlement.Org Content and Information/Referral Specialist, CIRS
Settlement.Org
link