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Entry into Canada valid PR Card - Questions 

sanrit
sanrit
Posts: 8


Posted On: 5/18/2017
sanrit
sanrit
Posts: 8
Hello Every one

Here I would like to know two thing
  • First I have valid PR card upto 15th june. out of 5 years i only stay for 5 month. I m going to reach on 2th june in canada. Can Airport Immigration Authority can reject me to enter in canada ?


  • Second Any Rules change for 730 Day Residential obligation for Renewal PR ?



Please guide me as soon as possible

Thank you
link
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2110


Posted On: 5/19/2017
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2110
Hello,

Thank you for sharing your situation and question with us.

From what you have stated, it sounds like you have not been able to meet your PR residency requirements.

You can find some additional information in the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada -How long must I stay in Canada to keep my permanent resident status? FAQ. Here is an excerpt,


Residency Requirement

To maintain your status as a permanent resident, you must live in Canada for at least two years within a five-year period. During this time you must be here physically.The two years may not need to be continuous.

An officer can confirm if your time in Canada counts when you:

  • re-enter Canada, or
  • apply for a permanent resident card.

Time spent outside Canada may also count towards the two years if you are:

  • travelling with your spouse or partner who is a Canadian citizen,
  • a child travelling with his or her father or mother who is a Canadian citizen,
  • an employee of (or under contract to) a Canadian business.
In terms of the process when re-entering Canada and whether or not you are still considered a Canadian Permanent Resident, each time you enter Canada, Citizenship and Immigration may calculate 5 years back from the date you have entered or re-entered Canada to see if you have fulfilled your residency obligation.

You can find additional information on the process that is followed when entering Canada in this Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) ENF 23 - Loss of Permanent Resident Status manual.

Here is an excerpt from the manual on what happens at the port of entry here:



"7.8 Examining Permanent Residents at a POE (Port of Entry)

When a permanent resident appears at a POE for examination, the officer must confirm that the person is a permanent resident. Officers must remain cognizant of the fact the Act gives permanent residents of Canada the right to enter Canada at a port of entry once it is established that a person is a Permanent Resident, regardless of non-compliance with the residency obligation in A28 or the presence of other grounds of inadmissability.

Port of entry officers (POE) can refuse entry to a Permanent Resident only when the person has already lost the status in accordance with the provisions of A46 (such as when a final determination has been made that they have failed to comply with the residency obligations or when a removal order comes into force).

In other words, once a permanent resident's status is established, the person may enter Canada by right and the immigration examination under IRPA concludes.

If an officer has concerns that a permanent resident has not complied with the residency obligation of A28, the officer should advise the permanent resident when the examination is concluded that they are authorized to enter Canada; however, the permanent resident may wish to answer additional questions so the officer may determine whether their concerns are well founded or not.

In cases where:
- permanent resident status is established;
- the permanent resident refuses to provide any further information and enters Canada;
and
- the officer believes, on a balance of probabilities that the person is in non-compliance with the residency obligation, officers may report the person, pursuant to A44(1). if there is sufficient evidence to support an inadmissibility allegation. In the absence of sufficient evidence to support the writing of an inadmissibility report, officers may enter any available information into FOSS (date of entry, last country of embarkation, current address in Canada etc.).


and

If an officer has concerns that a permanent resident has not complied with the residency obligation of A28, the officer should advise the permanent resident when the examination is concluded that they are authorized to enter Canada; however, the permanent resident may wish to answer additional questions so the officer may determine whether their concerns are well founded or not.


It is important to note that in terms of loss of permanent residency, a person does not lose it until a final determination has been made.

According to the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) ENF 23 - Loss of Permanent Resident Status manual,


It is important to note that a permanent resident does not lose their status under A46(1)(b) until there is a final determination of the decision made outside Canada that they have failed to comply with the residency obligation under A28.

Permanent residents are not finally determined to have lost their permanent resident status until the right of appeal has been exhausted.


Additionally, we have previously received some information from one of our legal researchers related to entering Canada and being in Canada after not meeting the residency requirements.

According to their research, the five-year time frame set out in the Refugee and Immigrant Protection Act is not static. Rather it is a moveable window that is dependent on the time at which a visa officer examines your situation.

Therefore, if you cannot fulfill the two-year (730 day) requirement for the five-year time frame starting from when you became a permanent resident and you are able to enter Canada, you should remain in Canada until you can satisfy the requirement for another five-year time frame.

The IRCC’s Permanent Residency Status Determination Manual states:

For persons who have been permanent residents of Canada for more than five years, the only five-year period that can be considered in calculating whether an applicant has met the residency obligation is the one immediately before the application is received in the visa office. A28(2)(b)(ii) precludes a visa officer from examining any period other than the most recent five-year period immediately before the date of receipt of the application.


Since the officer cannot choose any five-year time period for consideration, but must always assess the most recent five-year time period (the one immediately preceding examination), someone who is able to enter Canada in this situation, may still have the opportunity to satisfy the two-year “in Canada” requirement.

We suggest that it is best that you try to contact a reputable lawyer who is familiar with Canadian immigration issues for some assistance and additional information regarding your situation and your options.

I hope this information is helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions and if there is any follow up to your question/situation.
=====
Anna
Settlement.Org Content and Information/Referral Specialist, CIRS
Settlement.Org
link
sanrit
sanrit
Posts: 8


Posted On: 5/26/2017
sanrit
sanrit
Posts: 8
Dear Sir,

Thank you for your guide i have certain question
  • Q.1 Air port authority can not stop me just because i did not meet RO requirement ?
  • Q.2 IF sum private Canadian Business Person give me job for india [Hire] then that period of employment will be count ?
  • Q.3 Can i sponsor my parent even i have expired PR Card ?

Please guide i have flight for canada in next week


Thank you

Moderator wrote:
Hello,

Thank you for sharing your situation and question with us.

From what you have stated, it sounds like you have not been able to meet your PR residency requirements.

You can find some additional information in the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada -How long must I stay in Canada to keep my permanent resident status? FAQ. Here is an excerpt,


Residency Requirement

To maintain your status as a permanent resident, you must live in Canada for at least two years within a five-year period. During this time you must be here physically.The two years may not need to be continuous.

An officer can confirm if your time in Canada counts when you:

  • re-enter Canada, or
  • apply for a permanent resident card.

Time spent outside Canada may also count towards the two years if you are:

  • travelling with your spouse or partner who is a Canadian citizen,
  • a child travelling with his or her father or mother who is a Canadian citizen,
  • an employee of (or under contract to) a Canadian business.
In terms of the process when re-entering Canada and whether or not you are still considered a Canadian Permanent Resident, each time you enter Canada, Citizenship and Immigration may calculate 5 years back from the date you have entered or re-entered Canada to see if you have fulfilled your residency obligation.

You can find additional information on the process that is followed when entering Canada in this Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) ENF 23 - Loss of Permanent Resident Status manual.

Here is an excerpt from the manual on what happens at the port of entry here:



"7.8 Examining Permanent Residents at a POE (Port of Entry)

When a permanent resident appears at a POE for examination, the officer must confirm that the person is a permanent resident. Officers must remain cognizant of the fact the Act gives permanent residents of Canada the right to enter Canada at a port of entry once it is established that a person is a Permanent Resident, regardless of non-compliance with the residency obligation in A28 or the presence of other grounds of inadmissability.

Port of entry officers (POE) can refuse entry to a Permanent Resident only when the person has already lost the status in accordance with the provisions of A46 (such as when a final determination has been made that they have failed to comply with the residency obligations or when a removal order comes into force).

In other words, once a permanent resident's status is established, the person may enter Canada by right and the immigration examination under IRPA concludes.

If an officer has concerns that a permanent resident has not complied with the residency obligation of A28, the officer should advise the permanent resident when the examination is concluded that they are authorized to enter Canada; however, the permanent resident may wish to answer additional questions so the officer may determine whether their concerns are well founded or not.

In cases where:
- permanent resident status is established;
- the permanent resident refuses to provide any further information and enters Canada;
and
- the officer believes, on a balance of probabilities that the person is in non-compliance with the residency obligation, officers may report the person, pursuant to A44(1). if there is sufficient evidence to support an inadmissibility allegation. In the absence of sufficient evidence to support the writing of an inadmissibility report, officers may enter any available information into FOSS (date of entry, last country of embarkation, current address in Canada etc.).


and

If an officer has concerns that a permanent resident has not complied with the residency obligation of A28, the officer should advise the permanent resident when the examination is concluded that they are authorized to enter Canada; however, the permanent resident may wish to answer additional questions so the officer may determine whether their concerns are well founded or not.


It is important to note that in terms of loss of permanent residency, a person does not lose it until a final determination has been made.

According to the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) ENF 23 - Loss of Permanent Resident Status manual,


It is important to note that a permanent resident does not lose their status under A46(1)(b) until there is a final determination of the decision made outside Canada that they have failed to comply with the residency obligation under A28.

Permanent residents are not finally determined to have lost their permanent resident status until the right of appeal has been exhausted.


Additionally, we have previously received some information from one of our legal researchers related to entering Canada and being in Canada after not meeting the residency requirements.

According to their research, the five-year time frame set out in the Refugee and Immigrant Protection Act is not static. Rather it is a moveable window that is dependent on the time at which a visa officer examines your situation.

Therefore, if you cannot fulfill the two-year (730 day) requirement for the five-year time frame starting from when you became a permanent resident and you are able to enter Canada, you should remain in Canada until you can satisfy the requirement for another five-year time frame.

The IRCC’s Permanent Residency Status Determination Manual states:

For persons who have been permanent residents of Canada for more than five years, the only five-year period that can be considered in calculating whether an applicant has met the residency obligation is the one immediately before the application is received in the visa office. A28(2)(b)(ii) precludes a visa officer from examining any period other than the most recent five-year period immediately before the date of receipt of the application.


Since the officer cannot choose any five-year time period for consideration, but must always assess the most recent five-year time period (the one immediately preceding examination), someone who is able to enter Canada in this situation, may still have the opportunity to satisfy the two-year “in Canada” requirement.

We suggest that it is best that you try to contact a reputable lawyer who is familiar with Canadian immigration issues for some assistance and additional information regarding your situation and your options.

I hope this information is helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions and if there is any follow up to your question/situation.
=====
Anna
Settlement.Org Content and Information/Referral Specialist, CIRS
Settlement.Org
link
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2110


Posted On: 5/30/2017
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2110
Hello,

Unfortunately, we cannot provide you with a definitive response as to whether or not the process of loss of permanent residency will be started. It will all depend on the officer at the port of entry.

Regarding your second question,


Q.2 IF sum private Canadian Business Person give me job for india [Hire] then that period of employment will be count ?


You can find some additional information in the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada -How long must I stay in Canada to keep my permanent resident status? FAQ. Here is an excerpt,
Residency Requirement

To maintain your status as a permanent resident, you must live in Canada for at least two years within a five-year period. During this time you must be here physically.The two years may not need to be continuous.

An officer can confirm if your time in Canada counts when you:
  • re-enter Canada, or
  • apply for a permanent resident card.

Time spent outside Canada may also count towards the two years if you are:

  • travelling with your spouse or partner who is a Canadian citizen,
  • a child travelling with his or her father or mother who is a Canadian citizen,
  • an employee of (or under contract to) a Canadian business.



Additionally, it is important to note that, according to the information in the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) ENF 23 Loss of permanent resident status enforcement manual,

6.2 Canadian business

The definition applies to both large and small businesses, and includes:

  • federally or provincially incorporated businesses which have an ongoing operation in Canada;
  • other enterprises that have an ongoing operation in Canada, are capable of generating revenue, are carried out in anticipation of profit and in which a majority of voting or ownership interests is held by Canadian citizens, permanent residents or Canadian businesses;
  • enterprises which have been created by the laws of Canada or a province.

Note: It does not include businesses that have been created primarily for the purpose of allowing a permanent resident to satisfy his or her residency obligation while residing outside of Canada R61(2).


Regarding your third question,

Q.3 Can i sponsor my parent even i have expired PR Card ?



IRCC has changed how sponsors can apply. You can find the information on the IRCC website in the Changes for 2017 Parent and Grandparent Program section.



I hope this information is helpful. Please let us know if you have further questions and if there is any follow up to your question/situation.


=====
Anna
Settlement.Org Content and Information/Referral Specialist, CIRS
Settlement.Org
link