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Finding housing, buying a house, landlord/tenant rights.

What is the law for limit occupancy for housing? 

portfam
portfam
Posts: 1


Posted On: 8 days ago
portfam
portfam
Posts: 1
Hello. My family of four will be moving to Mississauga this December. My husband, myself, my mother, and our 7-month-old daughter will be there.
I have a study permit and my husband has a work permit. My mother will be coming with us on a tourist visa (she will be coming with us because she will be taking care of our 7-month-old daughter).



I am looking for a place that can accommodate 3 adults and an infant.
I was hoping to find a place with two bedrooms, but I saw an article that there is a law that restricts occupancy.
Is there a law in Canada that says how many people can live in how many rooms depending on zoning?


And for a family of four, how many bedrooms do we need?
If I apply for two bedrooms, is there a chance the owner will deny my application?


I really appreciate any help you can provide.
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Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3583


Posted On: 6 days ago
Moderator
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3583
Hi there,

Thank you for sharing your situation and question with us.

According to the Ontario Human Rights Commission:

"Section 2 of the Code prohibits discrimination in housing based on family status. This right applies to renting, being evicted, building rules and regulations, repairs, harassment, and use of services and facilities.There is a lengthy history of families with children being turned away from housing because of negative perceptions associated with family status. These negative perceptions are compounded for young families, lone parent families, families from racialized and Aboriginal communities, and those in receipt of social assistance. The pattern of complaints received by the Commission, as well as social science evidence, indicates that this is a persistent, endemic problem in the rental housing market. The continued prevalence of “adult only” housing despite the clear prohibitions of the Code is a strong example of this.
As well, families face a range of systemic barriers to accessing housing. Families with young children, lone parent families, parents with disabilities or parents of children with disabilities, families from racialized communities and Aboriginal and newcomer families are disproportionately likely to be low income. The shelter allowance rates for families on social assistance are far below market levels. This, together with tight rental housing supply in many parts of the province, puts families at a significant disadvantage when seeking shelter.
Families identified by multiple Code grounds face a double disadvantage when seeking housing – for example, a family that includes a member with a disability must find shelter that is both accessible and accepting of children.."


You may want to connect with housing assistance services near you to help you with your search. Community agencies that provide housing assistance services will be able to support you in finding suitable accommodation for the short-term and long-term. If you feel that you are being discriminated against, you may also want to contact the nearest Community Legal Clinic for some advice regarding your situation.

It may also help to connect with a community resource navigator at 211 to narrow your search. 211 Ontario is a free, confidential service.

Their phone service is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Here is a link to their live chat if you prefer to communicate online. Their live chat service is available Monday to Friday from 7am-9pm ET.

We hope this information is helpful. If you have any additional questions, please feel free to post them here.

Sincerely,


Your Settlement.Org Team
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